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McAfee have released their report “Mobility and Security: Dazzling Opportunities, Profound Challenges”.

“Devices are no longer just consumer devices or business devices. They are both,” said Richard Power, a CyLab Distinguished Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University, the primary author of the report. “Devices are more than extensions of the computing structure, they are extensions of the user. The way users interact with their personal data mirrors the way they want to interact with corporate data.”

Key Report Findings:

  • Reliance on mobile devices is already significant and accelerating rapidly; the emerging mobile environment is both diverse and freewheeling
  • IT is becoming increasingly consumerized as evidenced by the fact that 63 percent of devices on the network are also used for personal activities.
  • Lost and stolen mobile devices are seen as the greatest security concern for IT professionals and end-users – Four in 10 organizations have had mobile devices lost or stolen and half of lost/stolen devices contain business critical data. More than a third of mobile device losses have had a financial impact on the organization and two-thirds of companies that had mobile devices lost/stolen have increased their device security after this loss.
  • Risky behaviors and weak security postures are commonplace – Although the need for mitigating mobile security risks and threats is acknowledged, fewer than half of device users back up their mobile data more frequently than on a weekly basis. Around half of device users keep passwords, pin codes or credit card details on their mobile devices. One in three users keeps sensitive work-related information on their mobile devices.
  • There is a serious disconnect between the policy and reality – 95 percent of organizations have policies in place in regard to mobile devices
  • Mobile devices are being used by much of the workforce, over extended periods of time, for a significant percentage of tasks previously conducted on desktops.
  • On average, employees use mobile devices for work purposes between 2 and 4.5 hours a day. On average, use of laptops was 4.5 hours per day.

Mobile devices are used in a wide range of job functions

  • Business executives using them most – 56%
  • Sales and others in the mobile workforce – 47%

Mobile phone usage

  • Email – 93%
  • Contacts – 77%
  • Web access – 75%
  • Calendaring – 72%

Four different types of mobile devices are used by at least one-third of employees both for professional and personal use,

  • Laptops – 72%
  • Smartphones – 48%
  • Removable media, including USBs – 46%
  • External hard drive – 33%

Almost Half of Users Keep Sensitive Data on Mobile Devices

  Passwords/Pin Codes Credit Card details
Professional & personal information & data 23% 19%
Only professional information & data 11% 7%
Only personal information & data 17% 15%
I do not use, store or send this information or data using mobile devices 49% 58%

Recommendations for Businesses

  • Mobility is ushering a new computing paradigm into the workplace. With devices eclipsing PCs and virtually every business application being device-ready, mobile computing offers an opportunity to make workers more productive, competitive, and happy. Mobility done right is a major competitive advantage in the workplace.
  • Consumerization of IT is here to stay. Many smart companies are allowing, encouraging, and, in some cases, providing a stipend for,  employee owned technology to work. Businesses need to find ways to enable, secure, and manage employee-owned technology in an optimal way to drive cost savings.
  • Users are changing the way they think about policies. Because employee-owned devices are artifacts of the more entrepreneurial employee-employer relationship, organizations need to apply policies in a nuanced, risk-based way that depends on the industry, the role, and the situational context.
  • Data loss and leakage are of utmost concern to individuals and enterprises, and there is no silver bullet. Classify data, even at a high level, and apply data leakage processes and mechanisms in order to protect corporate data while respecting users’ privacy.
  • User awareness about mobile threats is still nascent. Apply security and management paradigms from laptops and desktops to mobile devices. Educate users about the risks and threats through employee agreements and training. “Businesses must find ways to protect corporate data, and call it back when an employee leaves, while ensuring the privacy of the employee,” says David Goldschlag, vice president of Mobility for McAfee. “Employees are no longer lifelong members of the organization, but rather consumers, who often change jobs every few years. When they do, they come with a kit of stuff, but once they leave, they need to give you back the data that belongs to the company. Businesses need a way to facilitate that process while respecting the ‘kit’ that the employee brings to the company.”

Recommendations for Mobile Users

  • You are part of a computing sea of change. With devices eclipsing PCs, and virtually every app device-ready, mobile computing offers you an opportunity to be entertained, informed and connected wherever you are. Use this to your advantage to be more productive on the go.
  • Driven by users’ desire for device choice and employers’ need for cost savings, individuals are increasingly bringing their own devices to work. Take advantage of your employers’ program and use your technology to be more nimble in your work.
  • Familiarize yourself with your employer’s mobile device policy and the intent behind it, and decide whether it fits your needs. If so, accept the policy and move on; if not, use two devices, one for personal use and one for work.
  • Take steps to secure your device. Install anti-theft technology, and back up your data. Configure your device to auto-lock after a period of time. Don’t store data you can’t afford to lose or have others access on an insecure device.
  • Be aware of mobile device threats. In many ways, they are the same as in the online world. You can be hacked, infected, or phished on a mobile device just as easily (and often more easily) as you can online.

The McAfee White Paper can be found here http://www.mcafee.com/us/about/news/2011/q2/20110523-01.aspx

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