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Brian Pennington

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PCI SSC

PCI Security Standards council announces 2016 special interest group election results

The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council (PCI SSC), has announced the election results for its 2016 Special Interest Group (SIG) project. 

Special Interest Groups are community-led initiatives that address important security challenges related to PCI Security Standards. One new Special Interest Group is selected every year, but groups may run for more than 12 months in order to complete the agreed-upon goals. 

PCI member organizations, including merchants, financial institutions, service providers and associations, voted on five proposed Special Interest Group topics submitted by their peers. The winning topic selected for 2016 was, “Best Practices for Safe E-Commerce 

The new Special Interest Group is slated to kick off in January 2016

The Council invites PCI member organizations and assessors interested in getting involved in this SIG project to register on the PCI SSC website by 4 January 2016.  

The community choose from among five strong proposals, so it was certainly not an easy decision,” said Jeremy King, International Director, PCI SSC. “We are encouraged by how many Participating Organizations were involved in the submission and election process this year. SIGs continue to be an excellent vehicle for putting their expertise to work to improve payment card security globally

 

Payment Card Industry issues new guidance to help organizations respond to data breaches

For any organization connected to the internet, it is not a question of if but when their business will be under attack, according to a recent cybersecurity report from Symantec, which found Canada ranked No. 4 worldwide in terms of ransomware and social media attacks last year. These increasing attacks put customer information, and especially payment data at risk for compromise.

When breaches do occur, response time continues to be a challenge. In more than one quarter of all breaches investigated worldwide in 2014 by Verizon, it took victim organization weeks, or even months, to contain the breaches. It is against this backdrop that global cybersecurity, payment technology and data forensics experts are gathering in Vancouver for the annual PCI North America Community Meeting to address the ongoing challenge of protecting consumer payment information from criminals, and new best practices on how organizations can best prepare for responding to a data breach. 

A data breach now costs organizations an average total of $3.8 million. However, research shows that having an incident response team in place can create significant savings. Developed in collaboration with the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Forensic Investigators (PFI) community, Responding to a Data Breach: A How-to Guide for Incident Management provides merchants and service providers with key recommendations for being prepared to react quickly if a breach is suspected, and specifically what to do contain damage, and facilitate an effective investigation. 

The silver lining to high profile breaches that have occurred is that there is a new sense of urgency that is translating into security vigilance from the top down, forcing businesses to prioritize and make data security business-as-usual,” said PCI SSC General Manager Stephen W. Orfei. “Prevention, detection and response are always going to be the three legs of data protection. Better detection will certainly improve response time and the ability to mitigate attacks, but managing the impact and damage of compromise comes down to preparation, having a plan in place and the right investments in technology, training and partnerships to support it

This guidance is especially important given that in over 95% of breaches it is an external party that informs the compromised organization of the breach,” added PCI SSC International Director Jeremy King. “Knowing what to do, who to contact and how to manage the early stages of the breach is critical

At its annual North America Community Meeting in Vancouver this week, the PCI Security Standards Council will discuss these best practices in the context of today’s threat and breach landscape, along with other standards and resources the industry is developing to help businesses protect their customer payment data. Keynote speaker cybersecurity blogger Brian Krebs will provide insights into the latest attacks and breaches, while PCI Forensic Investigators and authors of the Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report and PCI Compliance Report, will present key findings from their work with breached entities globally. Canadian organizations including City of Calgary, Interac and Rogers will share regional perspectives on implementing payment security technologies and best practices. 

Download a copy of Responding to a Data Breach: A How-to Guide for Incident Management here 

The original PCI SSC press release can be found here.

P2Pe, Pseudo-P2Pe, End-2-End Encryption, Linked Encryption, they are all good

This week’s Vendorcom Secure Payments Special Interest Group (SIG) met to discuss P2Pe and it became clear that there are many ways to achieve a compliant outcome.

My first impression was the large number of attendees at the SIG, 50+, only one of them was a Merchant. The rest were a mixed bag of Acquirers, PSPs, QSAs, Vendors and Consultants making it more of a Vested Interest Group than a Special one.

The Logic Group (TLG) started the presentations and covered their listed P2Pe solutions and how they achieved compliance. They explained all the hard work getting all the elements through the audits and the 970 P2Pe Controls (more than double that of PCI DSS).

TLG cited the issues of key custody and management and how once during the development period it required 6 people to cover the physical as well as the logical security requirements.

The Q&A session before lunch was mostly aimed at John Elliot of VISA Europe who handled even the most difficult questions very well and delivered the answers with humour. He even confirmed that next week there is a gathering in the US to ratify the much discussed Tokenization standard and some clarifications to the PCI DSS version 3.0. He however was wrong on one prediction that the new Self Assessment Questionnaires (SAQ) would be out on Thursday and they weren’t but to be fair to John almost everyone associated with PCI has tried to predict the arrival of the new SAQs and got it wrong. They finally came out today (28th February 2014).

After lunch Spire Payments and MagTek presented on their device solutions and their compatibility with the PCI PTS SRED and how they could fit into a P2Pe compliant solution.

Next up were Vodat International with their alternative to P2Pe. The Vodat solution is a managed end to end solution with encryption and resilience. Ian Martin’s presentation was supported by VISA Europe as a way to achieve PCI DSS compliance.

Some other discussion point

  • Linked Encryption combined with EMV could make a significant security improvement for the US market
  • Some merchants think switching to Ingenico gives them P2Pe
  • Some merchants and the PCI SSC are concerned that there are only two listed P2Pe solutions
  • PCI SSC would like to make P2Pe modular e.g. if you want to do your own key management or choose your own PEDs, etc.
  • An April deadline for moving to TLS 1.1 or above is not true, maintaining secure software is always required.
  • All mobile payments are mandated to have P2Pe
  • P2Pe will probably never be mandatory, except for mobile
  • If you have a certified P2Pe solution you can complete an SAQ no matter what size of merchant you are

It was an interesting day and after all the presentations and discussions what became clear is there are many ways to achieve PCI DSS compliance; Point to Point Encryption (P2Pe), Pseudo-P2Pe, End-2-End Encryption and Linked Encryption or a combination of them.

What is not in doubt is the chosen solutions must meet the business profile of the merchant and help them achieve PCI DSS compliance. The solution itself will not achieve compliance because there is more to compliance than installing a solution for example there is the on going maintenance of compliance and the human element.

Whichever solution you represent or are looking to buy lets hope it is installed and maintained well enough to meet and maintain continuous security and PCI DSS compliance.

Increasing Security and Reducing Fraud with EMV Chip and PCI Standards an Infographic

When data is exposed, it puts your customers and your reputation as a business at serious risk. EMV chip technology combined with PCI Security Standards offer a powerful combination for increasing card data security and reducing fraud.

PA DSS and PCI DSS version 3.0 now available in 9 languages

The PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC), have announced that the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and the Payment Application Data Security Standard (PA-DSS) 3.0 are now available in nine languages.

“It’s important that organizations around the globe have the resources they need to protect card data,” said Bob Russo, general manager, PCI Security Standards Council. “We’re happy to make the PCI Standards available in a number of languages to assist organizations as they work to make payment security part of their business-as-usual practices.”

PCI DSS and PA-DSS 3.0 were published in November 2013, with updates made based on feedback from the Council’s global constituents and response to market needs.

Over 50% of this feedback came from outside of the U.S., emphasizing the Council’s active international membership base.

The PCI SSC website supports translated pages and PCI materials including the new PCI DSS v3.0 and PA-DSS v3.0 in the following languages:

  • Chinese
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Portuguese
  • Russian
  • Spanish

“We continue to be encouraged by the growing participation from global stakeholders in PCI Standards development, said Jeremy King, international director, PCI Security Standards Council. “We’re optimistic that these translations will increase awareness and adoption of the standards and drive improved payment security.”

PCI-DSS and PA-DSS Version 3.0 – the full highlights and changes

Brian Pennington

The PCI SSC considered many things when drafting Version 3.0 of the PCI DSS and PA DSS standards including:

  • What will improve payment security?
  • Global applicability and local market concerns
  • Appropriate sunset dates for other standards or requirements
  • Cost/benefit of changes to infrastructure
  • Cumulative impact of any changes

The nature of the changes reflects the growing maturity of the payment security industry since the Council’s formation in 2006, and the strength of the PCI Standards as a framework for protecting cardholder data. Cardholder data continues to be a target for criminals.

Lack of education and awareness around payment security and poor implementation and maintenance of the PCI Standards leads to many of the security breaches happening today.

The updates address these challenges by building in additional guidance and clarification on the intent of the requirements and ways to meet them. Additionally, the changes in PCI DSS and PA-DSS 3.0 focus…

View original post 1,770 more words

PCI DSS Version 3, what does it have in store for you?

The PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC), have published PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and Payment Application Data Security Standard (PA-DSS) 3.0 Change Highlights as a preview of the new version of the standards coming in November 2013.

 Version 3.0 to focus on flexibility, education and awareness, and security as a shared responsibility

The changes will help companies make PCI DSS part of their business-as-usual activities by introducing more flexibility, and an increased focus on education, awareness and security as a shared responsibility.

The seven-page document is part of the Council’s commitment to provide as much information as possible during the development process and eliminate any perceived surprises for organizations in their PCI security planning. Specifically, the summary will help PCI Participating Organizations and the assessment community as they prepare to review and discuss draft versions of the standards at the 2013 Community Meetings in September and October.

Changes to the standards are made based on feedback from the Council’s global constituents per the PCI DSS and PA-DSS development lifecycle and in response to market needs.

Key drivers for version 3.0 updates include:

  • lack of education and awareness
  • weak passwords and authentication challenges
  • third party security challenges
  • slow self-detection in response to malware and other threats
  • inconsistency in assessments

Today, most organizations have a good understanding of PCI DSS and its importance in securing card data, but implementation and maintenance remains a struggle – especially in light of increasingly complex business and technology environments,” said Bob Russo, PCI SSC general manager

The challenge for us now is providing the right balance of flexibility, rigor and consistency within the standards to help organizations make payment security business-as-usual. And that’s the focus of the changes we’re making with version 3.0

Based on feedback from the industry, in 2010 the PCI SSC moved from a two-year to a three-year standards development lifecycle. The additional year provides a longer period to gather feedback and more time for organizations to implement changes before a new version is released. Version 3.0 will introduce more changes than version 2.0, with several new sub-requirements.

Proposed updates include:

  • Recommendations on making PCI DSS business-as-usual and best practices for maintaining ongoing PCI DSS compliance
  • Security policy and operational procedures built into each requirement
  • Guidance for all requirements with content from Navigating PCI DSS Guide
  • Increased flexibility and education around password strength and complexity
  • New requirements for point-of-sale terminal security
  • More robust requirements for penetration testing and validating segmentation
  • Considerations for cardholder data in memory
  • Enhanced testing procedures to clarify the level of validation expected for each requirement
  • Expanded software development lifecycle security requirements for PA-DSS application vendors, including threat modeling

 These updates are still under review by the PCI community. Final changes will be determined after the PCI Community Meetings and incorporated into the final versions of the PCI DSS and PA-DSS published in November.

PCI DSS and PA-DSS 3.0 will provide organizations the framework for assessing the risk involved with technologies and platforms and the flexibility to apply these principles to their unique payment and business environments, such as e-commerce, mobile acceptance or cloud computing,” added Troy Leach, PCI SSC chief technology officer

Merchants and Aquirers to Share PCI Lessons Learned at PCI SSC Community Meetings

The PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC), have announced PCI in Practice sessions for the 2013 PCI Community Meetings in Las Vegas, Nevada; Nice, France; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Case studies from members of the PCI community will share best practices in implementing payment card security programs.

PCI in Practice sessions for the North American and European Community Meetings will feature Chase Paymentech, Southwest Airlines and Time Warner Cable, Reliant Security, BT PLC and the Pan-Nordic Card Association. Australia Post will discuss its PCI journey at the Asia-Pacific Community Meeting:

  • The Importance of Merchant and Acquirer Communications Chase Paymentech, David Wallace, vice president of global merchant compliance; Southwest Airlines, Shawn Irving, senior manager of information security systems; Time Warner Cable, Erika Root, director, internal controls compliance, PCI Professional (PCIP) and Internal Security Assessor (ISA)
  • Secure Payment Systems Implementation – QIR in practice Reliant Security, Mark Weiner, managing partner, PCI Qualified Integrator & Reseller (QIR)
  • Successful Acquirer Collaboration on PCI – A Nordic case study Pan-Nordic Card Association, Mats Henriksson
  • QSAC Engagement – Tracing the PCI compliance journey of a multi-national corporation BT PLC, Sarah Nicholson, security policy & compliance manager; Candice Pressinger, head of group PCI-DSS compliance
  • Achieving and Maintaining Compliance – One approach to the PCI DSS journey Australia Post, Janelle Bull, risk manager, CardSafe program; Sharon Jokic, program director, CardSafe program

To register for the 2013 Meetings:

The Community Meetings are about sharing experiences and best practices with a large audience of peers for improved payment security,” said Bob Russo, general manager, PCI Security Standards Council. “And learning from one another is one of the best ways we as a community can continue to work together to increase payment card data protection globally. We’re looking forward to this year’s PCI in Practice sessions to hear about how these organizations representing different industries and geographies are effectively addressing PCI security within their unique business

PCI Security Standards Council announces new board of advisors

The PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC), announced election results for the 2013-2015 PCI SSC Board of Advisors.

The Board will represent the PCI community by providing counsel to SSC leadership.

The Council’s more than 690 Participating Organizations selected individuals from the following organizations to represent their industry’s unique perspectives in the development of PCI Standards and other payment security initiatives:

  • Bank of America N.A.
  • Bankalararasi Kart Merkezi
  • Barclaycard
  • British Airways PLC
  • Carlson
  • Cartes Bancaires Cielo S.A.
  • Cisco
  • Citigroup Inc.
  • European Payment Council AISBL
  • FedEx
  • First Bank of Nigeria
  • First Data Merchant Services
  • Global Payments Inc.
  • Ingenico
  • Micros
  • Middle East Payment Systems
  • PayPal Inc.
  • Retail Solutions Providers Association
  • RSA, The Security Division of EMC
  • Starbucks Coffee Company
  • VeriFone Inc.
  • Wal-Mart Stores, Inc
  • Woolworths Limited

Board of Advisor members provide strategic and technical input to PCI SSC on specific areas of Council focus. Past board members have provided reach into key industry verticals and geographies to help raise awareness and adoption of PCI Standards; have shared their experience with implementing PCI Standards in presentations at the annual Community Meetings; and have contributed guidance on training product development and led Special Interest Groups (SIGs).

Active involvement from our Participating Organization base is critical to ensuring the PCI Standards remain at the front line for protection against threats to payment card data. Once again I am impressed by the turn out in the election process. It’s particularly encouraging to see new markets looking towards open global standards like the PCI Standards to help secure payment card data worldwide,” said Bob Russo, general manager, PCI Security Standards Council.

The Council and wider stakeholder community will benefit from the breadth of experiences and perspectives that this new board represents.” The board will support the Council’s mission to raise awareness and drive adoption of PCI Standards worldwide and will kick off its work in June with its first face-to-face meeting with Council management. “This year saw more European involvement than ever in the Board of Advisors election process. Although Europe contains mature EMV markets, this level of involvement in the PCI SSC confirms that the combination of PCI Standards and EMV chip is a powerful force for protecting payment card data,” said Jeremy King, European director, PCI Security Standards Council. “Our new board is a truly global group, and the Council will benefit greatly from its input as we continue to drive awareness and adoption of PCI Standards worldwide.

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