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11 Cyber Security Questions Every Small Business Should Ask

BYOD security market to reach over $337 million

Technavio’s market research analysts expect the global BYOD security market to reach over $337 million between 2016 and 2020 

The increased use of mobile devices, triggered by the growing need for employee mobility, is the fundamental driving force behind growth in this market.  

The increase in employee mobility and the rising adoption of the Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) policy is leading to the increased use of mobile devices. Enterprises are increasingly adopting BYOD security solutions to secure their networks from growing security threats and to provide secure access to confidential information. 

North America accounts for more than 36% of the market share to dominate the global BYOD security market. The growing awareness among enterprises about the benefits of using BYOD security solutions on mobile devices coupled with the rise in the number of cyber-attacks and malware are some of the key factors contributing to the growth in the BYOD security market in the Americas during the forecast period.

The growing popularity of cloud-based BYOD security is the latest trend in the global BYOD security market. Cloud-based BYOD security does not require any hardware or software and can be controlled remotely, making it cost-effective for the end-users. Also, it has a faster response rate to the new security threats and unauthorized activities as well as allows companies to use software products on a pay-per-use basis and are cost effective. Limited hardware infrastructure, less dependency on internal IT personnel, faster implementation of IT solutions, no licensing costs, and low maintenance costs are some of the advantages of a cloud-based BYOD security system,” says Amrita Choudhury, Lead Analyst, ICT, Technavio Research.

Currently, the Mobile Content Management (MCM) segment occupies almost 52% of the market share to dominate the global BYOD security market. MCM is gaining prominence among large enterprises, government organizations, and small and medium-sized business (SMBs) because of the increased acceptance of the BYOD policy.  

Some vendors in the MCM market are even providing additional security features in the products that they are offering to gain consumer interest and market shares. For instance, AirWatch provides the Secure Content Locker that comprises of secure storage containers to safeguard data stored on mobile devices. 

The key vendors in the global BYOD security market include Citrix Systems, Good Technology, IBM, MobileIron, and VMware. The global BYOD security market highly fragmented owing to the presence of many international, regional, and local vendors. Established BYOD security solution vendors are likely to acquire small vendors to expand their product portfolio and increase their market share.  

During the forecast period, the level of vendor competition is likely to intensify with product and service extensions, technological innovations, and M&As.

 

100 Percent of Retailers Disclose Cyber Risks

According to BDO’s analysis of risk factors listed in the most recent 10-K filings of the 100 largest U.S. retailers, risk associated with a possible security breach was cited unanimously by retailers, claiming the top spot, up from the 18th spot in 2007.

Since major retail security breaches began making national headlines in 2013, retailers have become acutely aware of the growing cyber threat and cyber-related risks. Between new point-of-sale systems and evolving digital channels, the industry faces unique vulnerabilities: Retailers are responsible for safeguarding consumer data as well as their own, in addition to protecting against potential gaps in security related to third-party suppliers and vendors.

2016 marks the 10th anniversary of our retail risk factor analysis, and throughout the decade, we’ve seen the retail landscape undergo a dramatic evolution in response to the recession, new and maturing e-commerce channels and evolving consumer preferences,” said Doug Hart, partner in BDO’s Consumer Business practice. “Retailers over the years have proven to be in tune with the industry-wide issues and trends that could pose risks to their businesses, and they are clearly not tone deaf when it comes to reacting to the urgency of cybersecurity

The following chart ranks the top 25 risk factors cited by the 100 largest U.S. retailers:

Top 20 Risks for Retailers 2016 2015 2014
General Economic Conditions #1 100% #1 100% #1 100%
Privacy Concerns Related to Security Breach #1t 100% #4t 99% #8 91%
Competition and Consolidation in Retail Sector #3 98% #1t 100% #3 98%
Federal, State and/or Local Regulations #4 96% #1t 100% #2 99%
Natural Disasters, Terrorism and Geo-Political Events #5 94% #7 96% #13 87%
Implementation and Maintenance of IT Systems #6 93% #4 99% #7 92%
U.S. and Foreign Supplier/Vendor Concerns #6t 93% #6 98% #4 96%
Legal Proceedings #6t 93% #9t 95% #8t 91%
Labor (health coverage, union concerns, staffing) #9 91% #7t 96% #5 94%
Impediments to Further U.S. Expansion and Growth #10 90% #12t 92% #17 78%
Dependency on Consumer Trends #11 88% #9 95% #6 93%
Consumer Confidence and Spending #12 87% #15 89% #8t 91%
Credit Markets/Availability of Financing and Company Indebtedness #13 85% #11 94% #11 89%
Failure to Properly Execute Business Strategy #14 82% #12 92% #11t 89%
Changes to Accounting Standards and Regulations #15 76% #14 90% #13t 87%
International Operations #16 73% #17 86% #15 80%
Loss of Key Management/New Management #16t 73% #19 80% #16 79%
Marketing, Advertising, Promotions and Public Relations #18 66% #25 68% #24 64%
Consumer Credit and/or Debt Levels #19 62% #27 65% #23 65%
Joint Ventures #20 61% #21 76% #18 74%

Additional findings from the 2016 BDO Retail Risk Factor Report:

Cyber Risks Include Compliance Measures

As the cyber threat looms larger, retailers are bracing for new and emerging cybersecurity and data privacy legislation. Risks associated with cyber and privacy regulations were cited by 76 percent of retailers this year. This is in line with the findings from the 2016 BDO Retail Compass Survey of CFOs, in which nearly 7 in 10 retail CFOs said they expected cyber regulation to grow in 2016. These concerns have been highlighted by President Obama’s recently unveiled Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity and continued debate in Congress over information sharing between the government and private industry.

Retailers have not escaped regulatory scrutiny. The industry is also subject to Europay, Mastercard and Visa (EMV) standards that bolster credit card authentication and authorization. Industry analysts estimate that just 40 percent of retailers are compliant with EMV standards despite the Oct. 1, 2015 deadline.

“Mandating EMV chip-compliant payment systems is an important first step in shoring up the industry’s cyber defenses, but it’s just the tip of the iceberg,” said Shahryar Shaghaghi, National Leader of the Technology Advisory Services practice group and Head of International BDO Cybersecurity. “Online and mobile transactions remain vulnerable to credit card fraud and identity theft, and POS systems can still be hacked and provide an access point to retailers’ networks. New forms of malware can also compromise retailers’ IT infrastructure and disrupt business operations. Every retailer will experience a data breach at some juncture; the real question is what mechanisms have been put in place to mitigate the impact.”

E-Commerce Ubiquity Drives Brick & Mortar Concerns

Impediments to e-commerce initiatives also increased in ranking, noted by 57 percent of retailers in 2016, a significant contrast from 12 percent in 2007. In 2015, e-commerce accounted for 7.3 percent of total retail sales and is continuing to gain market share.

As e-commerce grows and businesses strive to meet consumers’ demand for seamless online and mobile experiences, retailers are feeling the effects in their physical locations. The recent wave of Chapter 11 bankruptcies and mass store closings among high-visibility retailers has raised concerns across the industry. Ninety percent of retailers are worried about impediments to growth and U.S. expansion this year. Meanwhile, risks associated with owning and leasing real estate jumped 14 percentage points to 54 percent this year.

Heightened worries over the impact of e-commerce on physical locations are far reaching, driving concerns over market competition for prime real estate and mall traffic to rise 19 percentage points to 46 percent. Meanwhile, consumer demand for fast shipping fueled an uptick in risks around the increased cost of mail, paper and printing, rising 10 percentage points from seven percent in 2015 to 17 percent this year.

General Economic Conditions Hold Weight

General economic risks have been consistently top of mind for retailers throughout all ten years of this survey. Even at its lowest percentage in 2008, this risk was still the second most cited, noted by 83 percent of companies.

Despite the fact that since 2013, general economic conditions have remained tied for the top risk, concerns about specific market indicators have receded.

For more information on the 2016 BDO Retail RiskFactor Report, view the full report here.

About the Consumer Business Practice at BDO USA, LLP

BDO has been a valued business advisor to consumer business companies for over 100 years. The firm works with a wide variety of retail and consumer business clients, ranging from multinational Fortune 500 corporations to more entrepreneurial businesses, on myriad accounting, tax and other financial issues.

Breaches caused by either hacking or malware nearly doubled in relative frequency

Beazley, a leading provider of data breach response insurance, today released its Beazley Breach Insights 2016 findings based on its response to over 2,000 breaches in the past two years. The specialized Beazley Breach Response (BBR) Services unit responded to 60% more data breaches in 2015 compared to 2014, with a concentration of incidents in the healthcare, financial services and higher education sectors.

Key data:

  • Breaches caused by either hacking or malware nearly doubled in relative frequency over the past year. In 2015, 32% of all incidents were caused by hacking or malware vs. 18% in 2014.
  • Unintended disclosure of records – such as a misdirected email – accounted for 24% of all breaches in 2015, which is down from 32% in 2014.
  • The loss of non-electronic physical records accounted for 16% of all breaches in 2015, which is unchanged from 2014.
  • The proportion of breaches involving third party vendors more than tripled over the same period, rising from 6% of breaches in 2014 to 18% of breaches in 2015.

Beazley’s data breach statistics are based on 777 incidents in 2014 and 1,249 in 2015.

We saw a significant rise in incidents caused by hacking or malware in the past year,” said Katherine Keefe, global head of BBR Services. This was especially noticeable in healthcare where the percentage of data breaches caused by hacking or malware more than doubled

Ransomware on the rise in healthcare

Hackers are increasingly employing ransomware to lock up an organization’s data, holding it until a ransom is paid in nearly untraceable Bitcoin. Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital in Los Angeles reported suffering a ransomware attack in February 2016 and ultimately paid the hackers $17,000 in Bitcoin. A year earlier, the FBI had issued an alert warning that ransomware attacks were on the rise.

This trend is borne out by Beazley’s data. Breaches involving ransomware among Beazley clients more than doubled to 43 in 2015 and the trend appears to be accelerating in 2016. Based on figures for the first two months of the year, ransomware attacks are projected to increase by 250% in 2016.

Clearly, new malware programs, including ransomware, are having a big impact, said Paul Nikhinson, privacy breach response services manager for BBR Services. Hacking or malware was the leading cause of data breaches in the healthcare industry in 2015, representing 27% of all breaches, more than physical loss at 20%

Healthcare is a big target for hackers because of the richness of medical records for identity theft and other crimes. In fact, a medical record is worth over 16 times more than a credit card record.”

Higher Education

Higher education also experienced an increase in breaches due to hacking or malware with these accounting for 35% of incidents in 2015, up from 26% in 2015.

Colleges and universities are reporting increased “spear phishing” incidents in which hackers send personalized, legitimate-looking emails with harmful links or attachments. The relatively open nature of campus IT systems, widespread use of social media by students and a lack of the restrictive controls common in many corporate settings make higher education institutions particularly vulnerable to data breaches.

Financial Services

In the financial services sector, hacking or malware was up modestly to 27% of industry data breaches in 2015 versus 23% in 2014. Trojan programs continued to be a popular hacking device.

Over 35% of organisations in the energy sector are not able to track threats

Tripwire 2016 Energy Survey: Physical Damage

Tripwire’s 2016 energy study was conducted by Dimensional Research on the cyber security challenges faced by organizations in the energy sector. The study was carried out in November 2015, and respondents included over 150 IT professionals in the energy, utilities, and oil and gas industries.

“After hundreds of years protecting our nation’s geographic borders, it is sobering to note that possibly the most vulnerable frontier happens to be the infrastructure that runs the largest companies in the country.”

Rheka Shenoy, VP and general manager of industrial IT cyber security for Belden

Does your organization have the ability to accurately track all the threats targeting your OT networks?

tripwire-2016-energy-survey-physical-damage-

Does your organization have the ability to accurately track all the threats targeting your OT networks?

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In your opinion, is your organization a target for a cyberattack that will cause physical damage?
tripwire-2016-energy-survey-physical-damage- 3
Is your organization a potential target for a nation-state cyberattack?
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The incredibly high percentages of these responses underscores the need for these industries to take material steps to improve cyber security. These threats are not going away. They are getting worse. We’ve already seen the reality of these responses in the Ukraine mere months after this survey was completed. There can be no doubt that there is a physical safety risk from cyber attacks targeting the energy industry today. While the situation may seem dire, in many cases there are well understood best practices that can be deployed to materially reduce the risk of successful cyber attacks.

Tim Erlin, director of IT security and risk strategy for Tripwire

Standard & Poor’s labeled holes in cybersecurity a financial risk in a report

Banks with weak cybersecurity controls could be downgraded even if they haven’t been attacked, Standard & Poor’s said Monday in a report.

While it hasn’t yet downgraded a bank based on its computer security, the ratings company said it would consider doing so if it determined the lender was ill-prepared to withstand a data breach. It would also drop a bank’s rating if an attack caused reputational harm or resulted in losses that hurt profit, S&P said.

We view weak cybersecurity as an emerging threat that has the potential to pose a higher risk to financial firms in the future, and possibly result in downgrades

S&P analysts led by Stuart Plesser wrote in the report.

Cyberattacks have become a growing threat for banks, with more than a dozen U.S. depository institutions reporting hacks in 2012 and 2013 that prevented consumers from accessing their websites, according to the report. Last year, the personal data of tens of millions of JPMorgan Chase & Co. customers were compromised in a breach. The bank spent $250 million on cybersecurity in 2014 and will increase that to $450 million by next year, S&P said.

Hostile nation-states, terrorist organizations, criminal groups, activists and, in some cases, company insiders are behind most of the global cyberattacks on banks, S&P said. South Korea financial institutions have experienced security breaches in recent years, while a Russian security company working with law enforcement said it uncovered a two-year, billion-dollar theft from banks around the world by a gang of cybercriminals, according to the report, which didn’t identify the lenders.

‘Continual Battle’

S&P classified the global risk of cyberattacks as “medium,” saying large banks have taken steps to mitigate the danger. Bigger institutions have an advantage over smaller ones because their revenue base can defray some expenses, according to the report.

Few banks have disclosed the amount they’re spending to guard against attacks, S&P said. Still, any cuts to technology units as part of larger cost-savings efforts would be “disconcerting.”

Cyberdefense is a continual battle, particularly as technology evolves,” according to the report. “Many tech experts believe that if a hostile nation-state put all its resources into infiltrating a particular bank’s tech system, it would probably prove successful

The original article was published in Crain”s New Yokr Business.

Mobile Payments Data Breaches will Grow

An ISACA survey of more than 900 cybersecurity experts shows that

  • 87% expect to see an increase in mobile payment data breaches over the next 12 months
  • 42% of respondents have used this payment method in 2015

The 2015 Mobile Payment Security Study from global cybersecurity association ISACA suggests that people who use mobile payments are unlikely to be deterred by security concerns.

Other data from the survey show that cybersecurity professionals are willing to balance benefits with perceived security risks of mobile payments:

  • 23% believe that mobile payments are secure in keeping personal information safe.
  • 47% say mobile payments are not secure and 30% are unsure.
  • At 89%, cash was deemed the most secure payment method, but only 9% prefer to use it.

Mobile payments represent the latest frontier for the ongoing choice we all make to balance security and privacy risk and convenience,” said John Pironti, CISA, CISM, CGEIT, CRISC, risk advisor with ISACA and president of IP Architects. “ISACA members, who are some of the most cyber-aware professionals in the world, are using mobile payments while simultaneously identifying and contemplating their potential security risks. This shows that fear of identity theft or a data breach is not slowing down adoption and it shouldn’t as long as risk is properly managed and effective and appropriate security features are in place

Reports say that contactless in-store payment will continue to grow. Overall, the global mobile payment transaction market, including solutions offered by Apple Pay, Google Wallet, PayPal and Venmo, will be worth an estimated US $2.8 trillion by 2020, according to Future Market Insights.

ISACA survey respondents ranked the major vulnerabilities associated with mobile payments:

  1. Use of public WiFi (26%)
  2. Lost or stolen devices (21%)
  3. Phishing/shmishing (phishing attacks via text messages) (18%
  4. Weak passwords (13%)
  5. User error (7%)
  6. There are no security vulnerabilities (0.3%)

What Consumers Need to Know

According to those surveyed, currently the most effective way to make mobile payments more secure is using two ways to authenticate their identity (66%), followed by requiring a short-term authentication code (18%). Far less popular was an option that puts the onus on the consumer installing phone-based security apps (9%).

CSX-Mobile-3-lg

People using mobile payments need to educate themselves so they are making informed choices. You need to know your options, choose an acceptable level of risk, and put a value on your personal information,” said Christos Dimitriadis, Ph.D., CISA, CISM, CRISC, international president of ISACA and group director of information security for INTRALOT. “The best tactic is awareness. Embrace and educate about new services and technologies

Understand your level of risk: Ask yourself what level of personal information and financial loss is acceptable to balance the convenience of mobile payments.

Know your options: Understand the security options available to manage your risk to an acceptable level. Using a unique passcode should be mandatory, but also look into encryption, temporary codes that expire and using multiple ways to authenticate your identity.

Value your personal information: Be aware of what information you are sharing e.g., name, birthday, national identification number, pet name, email, phone number. These pieces of information can be used by hackers to gain access to accounts. Only provide the least amount of information necessary for each transaction.

Security Governance for Retailers and Payment Providers

In the emerging mobile payment landscape, ISACA notes that there is no generally accepted understanding of which entity is responsible for keeping mobile payments secure—the consumer, the payment provider or the retailer. One approach is for businesses to use the COBIT governance framework to involve all key stakeholders in deciding on an acceptable balance of fraud rate vs. revenue. Based on that outcome, organizations should set policies and make sure that mobile payment systems adhere to them.

Members of the IT or information security group taking part in the discussion should also ensure they are keeping up to date with the latest cybersecurity developments and credentials. A joint 2015 ISACA/RSA study shows that nearly 70% of information security/information technology professionals require certification when looking for candidates to fill open security positions.

The full ISACA Press Release can be found here.

In cloud environments, 75% of the security risk can be attributed to just 1% of users

Cybercriminals continue to focus their efforts on what is widely considered to be the weakest link in the security chain: the user. Consequently, developing a comprehensive understanding of user behavior and the implications thereof becomes paramount to corporate security strategy.

In analysing user behavior across 10 million users, 1 billion files, and over 91,000 cloud applications, CloudLock surfaced surprising trends.

In this report, Cloudlock examine cloud cybersecurity trends across three primary dimensions: users, collaboration, and applications. The Pareto Principle, the “80/20” rule, holds true across all three dimensions, revealing a truth with surprising implications for security professionals.

Key Findings

Users: 1% of users create 75% of cloud cybersecurity risk, signalling abnormal user behavior whether unintentional or malicious.

  • Collaboration: While organizations on average collaborate with 865 external parties, just 25 of these account for 75% of cloud-based sharing per organization. Unexpectedly, 70% of sharing occurs with non-corporate email addresses security teams have little control over.
  • Apps: 1% of users represent 62% of all app installs in the cloud – a high concentration. Without security awareness, this small user base introduces a high volume of risk. Additionally, 52,000 installs of applications are conducted by highly privileged users – a number that should be zero given privileged accounts are highly coveted by malicious cybercriminals.

4 Actionable Takeaways for a more secure cloud environment

The findings of this report show disproportionate cloud cybersecurity risk across users, collaboration, and applications. Consider the four following risk remediation strategies.

1. Focus on the User Behavior

Focusing on the riskiest subset of users, security professionals can efficiently and dramatically reduce risk. Any abnormal behavior by data-dense and risky users should be prioritized providing the security team with valuable direction on what truly requires attention and resolution immediately.

2. Focus Security on Organizations You Collaborate With Most

Given that, on average, 75% of inter-organizational sharing is with 25 external organizations, focus on the frequent collaborative organizations to eliminate the bulk of risk, then address the long tail of remaining organizations.

3. Take Application Security beyond Discovery

Discovering third-party applications that reside on the network is only the tip of the iceberg. Elevate your security game beyond app discovery through enforcement capabilities, policy-driven app control, and end-user education. If users are blocked, they will find a way around.

4. Correlate Insights Across Cloud Environments

With multi-cloud intelligence, security teams can correlate security events across platforms, preventing cybercriminal exploits from slipping through the cracks. Consider an individual logging into Salesforce in San Francisco and ServiceNow in Kuala Lumpur using the same credentials simultaneously, indicating account compromise. Avoid point security solutions in favor of platforms offering multi-cloud insights across not only SaaS applications, but also laaS, PaaS, and IDaaS environments.

Internal Audit is having an ever increasing role in Cyber Security

According to a report by the Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation, cyber preparation at most organizations follows a classic bell curve.

Asked, for instance, how prepared their organizations would be to respond to a cyber-attack;

  • 29% of respondents said “extremely” or “very”
  • 44 % said “moderately”
  • 23% said “slightly” or an ominous “not at all”

As organizations increase spending on tech tools to address cyber risks, internal auditors are advocating a holistic approach that includes policies, response planning and board involvement to develop a broader view of an organization’s cyber risks and defences.

Helped by their understanding of organization controls and risk management, internal audit can bring various functions together and help them address cyber threats more effectively, the study says.

“Boards and audit committees also must … be kept up-to-date on technologies that not only can help meet business objectives, but also may make an organization more vulnerable to attack. When properly resourced and supported, internal audit will develop the skills and perspective to provide review and assurance services in this area,” the study says.

Key Components

The report identifies five key components to cyber risk management and says internal audit can play a key role in supporting each element:

  1. Protection: Internal audit can help organizations test security controls related to bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies, review third-party contracts for compliance with security protocols, and perform IT governance assurance services.
  2. Detection: IIA’s 2015 Global Internal Audit Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) study found that five in 10 respondents use data mining and data analytics for risk and control monitoring, as well as fraud identification. The cyber preparedness study says audit executives should partner with IT and information security pros to develop and monitor key risk indicators and validate security-related controls.
  3. Business Continuity: Just as they plan for natural disasters or other corporate crises, organizations have to develop plans to serve customers and other stakeholders during cyber-attacks. Internal audit can help provide enterprise-wide perspective and provide assurance about the expected effectiveness of response plans.
  4. Crisis Communications: Similar to response plans, it’s important to keep customers, shareholders, regulators and other interested parties informed during (and immediately after) a cyber breach.
  5. Continuous Improvement: If an organization experiences a cyber-attack, internal audit can play a valuable role in helping the organization assess the effects and outline strategies and protocols to defend against the next attack.

The study also suggests corporate boards increase their ability to assess and defend against cyber risks. This may involve recruiting board and committee members with cyber-related experience or expertise, or bringing in third-party security experts to educate board members about evolving cyber threats and governance practices.

The full article can be downloaded here.

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