Bloomberg Intelligence August 24, 2015

This analysis is by Bloomberg Intelligence analysts Charles Graham and Edmond Christou.  It originally appeared on the Bloomberg Professional Service.

Personal data theft, cyber-attacks whet appetite for insurers

The value of personal data stored on corporate databases is rapidly increasing. For EU citizens it is set to reach 1 trillion euros ($1.4 trillion) by 2020, according to Boston Consulting Group. This is raising the need for greater protection. The increased incidence of data breaches and misuses as hackers become more sophisticated has also imposed greater regulatory requirements on businesses. Companies are seeking new products from insurers to limit the cost of interruption, reputational damage and penalties.

Companies Impacted: While cyber risk potentially affects many classes of business, there are a number of providers including AIG, Allianz, Munich Re, Swiss Re and Zurich Insurance Group, as well as specialist insurers like Beazley and Hiscox, which have developed specific cyber products.

Photographer: Craig Warga/Bloomberg

Insurers view industry as ill-prepared for risk of cyber theft

Cyber theft is top of the list of risks for which businesses are least prepared, according to Allianz’s 2015 Risk Barometer Survey. Companies need to understand the potential effect of a cyber-attack on their supply chain, the liability they could face if they can’t deliver products on time and the legal penalties if they lose customer data. While computer systems can be improved, it is impossible to make them entirely secure. This is creating opportunities for insurers.

Companies Impacted: Allianz’s 4th Risk Barometer Survey was conducted among global businesses and risk consultants, underwriters, senior managers and claims experts within Allianz in October and November 2014. Insurers offering cyber-risk cover include AIG, Allianz, Zurich, Beazley and Hiscox.

Swelling cyber-attack costs are driving wider insurance coverage

The average cost of a data breach has increased to $3.79 million, according to a study by the Ponemon Institute based on a survey of 350 companies in 11 countries. This cost has increased by 23% since 2013. The average cost for each lost or stolen record containing sensitive information rose to $154 this year from $145 in 2014. Concerns about data breaches and privacy have led to legal reforms in the U.S. and Europe, which may help drive demand for cyber-insurance.

Companies Impacted: Increasing cyber-attacks have driven insurers such as AIG, Allianz, Beazley, Hiscox and Zurich Insurance, to expand their product offerings to include first- and third-party coverage for cyber-risk.

Retailers face biggest threat from cyber theft, data breaches

Retailers face the biggest threat from data breaches, according to figures compiled by Zurich Insurance. The food and beverage industry is second in line for hackers followed by hospitality, finance and professional services. Carphone Warehouse discovered on Aug. 5 that personal data of 2.4 million of its customers and encrypted credit card details for 90,000 clients may have been accessed in a data breach. Insurers are tailoring products to meet different industries cyber risks.

Companies Impacted: Insurers work with companies to identify best practices in data privacy and security to help to minimize the financial cost should a breach occur. AIG, Allianz, Beazley, Hiscox, Zurich Insurance are among the companies to have developed cyber-insurance coverage.

Die hard 4.0 cyber scenario could cost more than $1 trillion

A cyber-attack on the U.S. power grid could cost $243 billion rising to more than $1 trillion in the most extreme scenario, according to a study by Lloyd’s of London and the University of Cambridge. The report examines the insurance implications of a major cyber-attack. It depicts a scenario where hackers shut parts of the grid, plunging 15 U.S. states and Washington DC into darkness, leaving 93 million people without power. Insurers are just starting to wake up to the scale of potential losses.

Companies Impacted: Cyber-insurance risks are widely underwritten at Lloyd’s with 47 managing agents offering cover, including quoted groups Beazley, Hiscox and Novae. Lloyd’s introduced new risk codes for data and privacy breaches and cyber-related property damage in 2015.

Swiss re joins forces with IBM to fight cyber threat

Munich Re has partnered with Hewlett-Packard and Swiss Re with IBM to develop solutions that offer clients cyber protection and provide support in the event of a security breach. IBM will assess clients’ external and internal vulnerability to cyber-attacks and offer options for mitigating these risks. IBM’s security platform provides intelligence to help organizations protect their clients’ data, applications and infrastructure.

Peer Comparison: Swiss Re’s Corporate Solutions business is one of a number of insurers offering cyber coverage. Other companies include AIG, Allianz and Zurich Insurance.

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