The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has published guidelines to on how business treat personal information in the cloud whether that is a private or public cloud.

The data protection regulator ICO is concerned that many businesses do not realise they remain responsible for how the data is handled whilst it is in the cloud.

This has resulted in the ICO publishing a guide to cloud computing, to help businesses comply with the law.

The guide gives tips including:

  • Seek assurances on how your data will be kept safe. How secure is the cloud network, and what systems are in place to stop someone hacking in or disrupting your access to the data?
  • Think about the physical security of the cloud provider. Your data will be stored on a server in a data centre, which needs to have sufficient security in place.
  • Have a written contract in place with the cloud provider. This is a legal requirement, and means the cloud provider will not be able to change the terms of the service without your agreement.
  • Put a policy in place to make clear the expectations you have of the cloud provider. This is key where services are funded through adverts targeted at your customers: if they’re using personal data and you haven’t asked your customers’ permission, you’re breaking data protection law.
  • Don’t forget that transferring data internationally brings a number of obligations – that includes using cloud storage based abroad.

Speaking as the guide was launched, author Dr Simon Rice, ICO technology policy advisor, said:

“The law on outsourcing data is very clear. As a business, you are responsible for keeping your data safe. You can outsource some of the processing of that data, as happens with cloud computing, but how that data is used and protected remains your responsibility.

“It would be naïve for an organisation to take the attitude that these guidelines are too much effort to simply store some data in a different place. Where personal information is involved, the stakes are high and the ICO has already demonstrated it will act firmly against those who don’t meet data protection laws”

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