The Identity Theft Council (ITC) has recently issued a press release promoting Identity Theft awareness and offered advice on how to avoid the problem.

They quote from a Javelin Strategy & Research study found that fraud suffered by

  • Small Business Owners (SMBO) totaled an $8 billion
  • Banks, merchants and other providers absorbed at least $5.43 billion of that loss
  • The cost to victims was $2.61 billion

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, the small business represents more than 99 percent of all U.S. businesses, and of the estimated 27 million small businesses, more than 21 million are sole proprietors. The ITC concluded that small business were ideal candidates for identity theft.

“The ITC works with individual identity theft victims and small business owners to educate them about identity theft and to provide resolution services,” said Neal O’Farrell, Executive Director of the Identity Theft Council (ITC), and security expert. “Unfortunately, small business owners are being targeted more today than ever before due to the criminals ability to easily access important information and go undetected.”

Identity Theft Council Tips for Preventions and Detection:

  • Write a security plan. Security starts with a plan. A plan can be as simple as the security rules, guidelines, and goals for your business, and the consequences for ignoring them. A plan is also an easy way to help you remember your security priorities.
  • Do an inventory of your data. Data is what the thieves want, whether its customer account or credit card data, employee Social Security numbers, or even databases of target customers. If you don’t know what data you have in your business, or where it is, then you can’t effectively protect it.
  • Train your employees. Enlist every employee, family member, partner, and contractor as a vigilant sentry so that every stakeholder understands how to protect their corner of cyberspace. Most thieves will target the weakest link, and that’s usually a careless or untrained employee.
  • Guard your business accounts well. As a business owner you don’t enjoy the benefits of zero liability, so if your account is emptied by crooks, the bank won’t bail you out.
  • Restrict employee and insider access to data. For everyone’s safety employees should only have access to the data they need to do their job. And that access should also be monitored.
  • Be especially wary of banking Trojans. These highly sophisticated programs can easily creep on to your computers, steal banks logins and passwords, and quickly empty your bank accounts.
  • Monitor your bank accounts and credit cards constantly. These can often provide the earliest warning that thieves have obtained your account information and have started to use it. Most financial institutions provide free instant alerts to warn you about any unusual account activity.
  • Be wary of business identity theft, too. Business identity theft is a growing problem, and it involves criminals using publicly available information about your company to pretend to be the legitimate owners of your business so they can take out substantial loans and leave you to clean up the mess. An easy precaution is to regularly Google your business name for any clones.
  • Use the available technologies. As a small business owner you have many choices when it comes to protecting your employees, your computers, and your data from cyber thieves. And some of the best tools are free. So make sure every computer in your business is locked down with layers of security technology.

“As a co-founder of the Identity Theft Council, Intersections believes in helping victims of ID theft find resolution, and in educating the community about how to protect themselves from the crime,” said Michael Stanfield, Chairman and CEO of Intersections Inc. “Small business owners are a unique group of victims that straddle between the consumer and business world, and are a prime target for criminals.”

Find the ITC website here

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