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ICO response to ECJ ruling on personal data to US Safe Harbor

The ICO has issued a statement in response to the European Court of Justice ruling about the legal basis for the transfer of personal data to businesses that are members of the US Safe Harbor

Deputy Commissioner David Smith said:

“Today’s ruling is clearly significant and it is important that regulators and legislators provide a considered and clear response. This ruling is about the legal basis for the transfer of personal data to businesses that are members of the US Safe Harbor. It does not mean that there is an increase in the threat to people’s personal data, but it does make clear the important obligation on organisations to protect people’s data when it leaves the UK.

“The judgment means that businesses that use Safe Harbor will need to review how they ensure that data transferred to the US is transferred in line with the law. We recognise that it will take them some time for them to do this.

“It is important to bear in mind that the Safe Harbor is not the only basis on which transfers of personal data to the US can be made. Many transfers already take place based on different provisions. The ICO has previously published guidance on the full range of options available to businesses to ensure that they are complying with the law related to international transfers. We will now be considering the judgment in detail, working with our counterpart data protection authorities in the other EU member states and issuing further guidance for businesses on the options open to them. Businesses should check the ICO website for details over the coming weeks.

“Concerns about the Safe Harbor are not new. That is why negotiations have been taking place for some time between the European Commission and US authorities with a view to introducing a new, more privacy protective arrangement to replace the existing Safe Harbor agreement. We understand that these negotiations are well advanced.”

Personal data in leaked datasets is still personal data – ICO

By Simon Rice, Group Manager for Technology at the Information Commissioners Office (ICO).

Personal data in leaked datasets is still personal dataThey say ‘no publicity is bad publicity’, but after spending most of the week trending on Twitter, I wonder if the users of the Ashley Madison site might disagree.

Having already prompted a flurry of news stories when the online attack of the Ashley Madison servers was first revealed, this week we’ve seen another wave of coverage as the personal data was published online.

Wherever your sympathies might lie in relation to the people identified in the published data set, the fact remains that such details are personal information, with certain protections in law.

Like many online attacks, the data protection response is international. In this case, we’re liaising with our counterparts in Canada, where the company is based.

But with cases like this, there is still a domestic aspect to consider.

Anyone in the UK who might download, collect or otherwise process the leaked data needs to be aware they could be taking on data protection responsibilities defined in the UK’s Data Protection Act.

Similarly, seeking to identify an individual from a leaked dataset will be an intrusion into their private life and could also lead to a breach of the DPA.

Individuals will have a range of personal reasons for having created an account with particular online services (or even had an account created without their knowledge) and any publication of further personal data without their consent can cause them significant damage or distress.

It’s worth noting too that any individual or organisation seeking to rely on the journalism exemption should be reminded that this is not a blanket exemption to the DPA and be encouraged to read our detailed guide on how the DPA applies to journalism.

This is not the first time an online service has suffered such an attack and unfortunately it’s unlikely to be the last. But it’s important people don’t assume that the law and the protections it affords to UK individuals don’t apply online.

Have your details been published in a dataset?

If you find your personal data being published online then you have a right to go to that publisher and request that the information is removed. This applies equally to information being shared on social media. If the publisher is based in the UK and fails to remove your information you can complain to the ICO.

Two thirds of British workers willing to breach data protection rules

Despite the risk to their employer of criminal proceedings and heavy fines, two thirds (66%) of UK workers would not report a serious data protection breach if they thought it would get one of their  colleagues into trouble, according to recent research.

The study by telecoms and IT firm Daisy Group, which looked at data security risks, found that 13% UK workers had disabled the password protection features on work laptops, mobiles, or tablet devices because they found them annoying. Of those who did have password protection, 36% said they didn’t change their passwords regularly, and 17% admitted their password was very simple and would be easy to guess.

Data security breaches 

However, if asked by a third party to email a client or supplier’s personal details outside of the company,  56% said they wouldn’t and 19% said they would check with their boss before doing so. Although 7% said that they would send the details without querying the request, as they didn’t think anyone would mind.

When asked if data security was an important issue for the company they worked for, 19% said they had no idea.

Cloud specialist, Graham Harris, explained: When it comes to data security, all too often businesses focus purely on IT processes and forget about the staff that will be using them.

As our research identified, human error is one of, if not the most likely source for data security issues, and fear of reprisal is a powerful force. Businesses must be proactive and educate their staff about what data security processes and policies there are, why they exist, what the staff member’s responsibilities are and reassure them about what to do in the event of a problem

confidential

Estate agents and those working in the property industry were among the most likely to turn a blind eye to colleagues’ data security failings, with 71% saying they wouldn’t report a data security breach that would get a colleague into trouble. Those working in marketing were the most likely to raise the alarm.

Despite the potential risk of commercially-sensitive data theft, business management and professional services workers were the most likely to disable data security features on their mobile devices.

Mobile Device Management 

The research was conducted to assess the demand among UK businesses for ‘mobile device management’. The new cloud-based technology gives organisations more control over smartphones and tablet computers by letting them remotely track and wipe the content of any lost or stolen devices, thereby ensuring the information remains confidential.

According to one statistic, 180,000 computing and communication devices were lost or stolen in the UK last year, but it is likely that the true figure is much higher as not all thefts are reported to the police.

Graham Harris explained: “It is important to ‘common sense’ test any security system. Procedures that are complicated or disrupt the working environment often result in employees finding ways to circumnavigate them or taking matters in their own hands. Similarly, it is important to plan for human error and problems, such as theft or loss of devices that carry important data, so that when they do occur, they can be dealt with quickly and effectively.”

The EU is currently in the process of reforming laws on Data Protection which, among other things, will require organisations to report data protection breaches to the relevant authorities within 24 hours. It is anticipated that the penalties for failure to comply will increase to as much as €100m. The legislation changes are expected to be in force by the end of 2018.

Most consumers do not trust anyone to protect their personal information

Fortinet surveys reveal growing cyber threat concerns as more consumers fear data breaches, while CISOs lack confidence in their ability to stop them.

Despite their concerns, third-party studies reveal consumer behaviours may present greater challenges for organizations that don’t have the right security protections in place.

Two industry surveys commissioned by Fortinet reveals

  • 71% of consumers across the U.S. are more nervous about their personal information being stolen through a data breach than they were just a year ago
  • 28% of IT security professionals are confident they have done enough to prevent a security incident

Despite this shift in consumer sentiment, the research revealed consumers are not taking necessary precautions to protect their personal information. When asked what measures they are implementing to better safeguard their information online:-

  • 76% of respondents said they had merely implemented stronger passwords – a step that is typically required when setting up an online account
  • 20% said they aren’t doing anything at all

It is no question the cyber threat environment remains dynamic and dangerous, and is gaining in severity. According to a recent report released by the Identity Theft Resource Center (IRK), companies in the U.S. experienced a record-breaking 783 data breaches in 2014.

Already in 2015 this trend has continued with the Anthem Health security breach – the largest in history, affecting more than 80 million of its customers, as well as Sony, TV Monde and others. Many of these attacks were initiated by sophisticated hackers looking for ways to circumvent perimeter defences through compromised devices, while others originated from within the network through unsuspecting employees or partners who, without malicious intent, let cyber criminals in.

The amount of entry points cyber criminals can use to infiltrate corporate networks and steal precious information is growing rapidly, as the number of devices connected to the network increase,” said Andrew Del Matte, chief financial officer at Fortinet. “If consumers aren’t taking precautions to protect their devices and proprietary data in their personal lives, it is unlikely they are doing so at work, increasing the possibility of a breach. It is more critical now than ever before for businesses to help safeguard the consumer and customer data for which they are responsible. They must take a multi-layered approach to security to protect against both malicious and non-malicious threats, from both inside and outside of the network

On a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being “completely trust” and 5 being “don’t trust at all,” consumers were asked how much they trust various business providers and other institutions to protect their information. The survey found:

  • 31% of consumers completely trust their doctors
  • 18% completely trust their health insurance providers
  • 27% completely trust their personal banks
  • 14% completely trust their credit card companies
  • 19% completely trust their employers
  • 4% completely trust retailers

Are Organizations Doing Enough?

In a survey of 250 IT professionals with authority over the security decisions for their organizations,

  • 57% indicated they are most concerned about protecting customer data from cyber criminals.
  • 28% of those surveyed, are completely confident their organizations have done everything possible to prevent a security incident
  • 26% said they were only half-confident that they have taken the necessary measures to protect their organization from potential risk

Consumers are more concerned than ever about their personal information being compromised through a data breach, with good reason,” said Derek Manky, senior security strategist at Fortinet’s FortiGuard Labs. “The evolving threat landscape puts everyone at greater risk, particularly organizations that aren’t taking the time to rethink their approach to security. An old school approach won’t do. Businesses should seek out a best-of-breed security partner with scale, third-party validated solutions and access to the most up-to-date threat intelligence, to safeguard their networks from threats, no matter the type or where it is initiated, today and in the future

Who breached the Data Protection Act in 2014? Find the complete list here.

2014 was another busy year for the Information Commissioners Office with yet more breaches of the Data Protection Act.

There are normally three types of punishments administered by the ICO

  1. Monetary. The most serious of the actions and one normally reserved for organisational entities.
  2. Undertaking. Typically applied when an organisation has failed to adhere to good business practise and needs the helping guidance of the ICO
  3. Prosecutions. Normally reserved for individuals who have blatantly breached the Act.
  4. Enforcements. A requirement on an organisation or individual to desist from specific activities.

Below is a summary of the ICO’s activity in 2014 across all three “punishment” areas.

Monetary penalty notices

A monetary penalty will only be served in the most serious situations. When deciding the size of a monetary penalty, the ICO takes into account the seriousness of the breach and other factors like the size, financial and other resources of an organisation’s data controller. The ICO can impose a penalty of up to £500,000. It is worth noting that monetary penalties are to HM Treasury.

  • 22 August 2014 a monetary penalty of £90,000 was issued to Kwik Fix Plumbers Ltd for continually making nuisance calls targeting vulnerable victims. In several cases, the calls resulted in elderly people being tricked into paying for boiler insurance they didn’t need.
  • 5 December 2014 a monetary penalty of £70,000 was issued to Manchester Ltd after sending unsolicited text messages and appeared on the recipients’ mobile phone to have been sent by “Mum”.
  • 05 November 2014 a monetary penalty of £7,500 was issued to Worldview Limited following a serious data breach where a vulnerability on the company’s site allowed attackers to access the full payment card details of 3,814 customers
  • 01 October 2014 a monetary penalty of £70,000 was issued to fine to EMC Advisory Services Limited for making hundreds of nuisance calls. The company was responsible for 630 complaints to the ICO and the TPS between 1 March 2013 and 28 February 2014. They failed to make sure that those registered with the TPS, or who’d previously asked not to be contacted, weren’t being called.
  • 26 August 2014 a monetary penalty of £180,000 to the Ministry of Justice over serious failings in the way prisons in England and Wales have been handling people’s information
  • 28 July 2014 a monetary penalty of £50,000 fine to Reactiv Media Limited after an investigation discovered they had made unsolicited calls to hundreds of people who had registered with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS).
  • 23 July 2014 a monetary penalty of £150,000 to Think W3 Limited after a serious breach of the Data Protection Act revealed thousands of people’s details to a malicious hacker.
  • 03 April 2014 a monetary penalty of £50,000 Amber UPVC Fabrications Ltd (T/A Amber Windows) after an investigation discovered they had made unsolicited marketing calls to people who had registered with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS).
  • 19 March 2014 a monetary penalty of £100,000 to Kent Police after highly sensitive and confidential information, including copies of police interview tapes, were left in a basement at the former site of a police station.
  • 07 March 2014 a monetary penalty of £200,000 to the British Pregnancy Advice Service. Hacker threatened to publish thousands of names of people who sought advice on abortion, pregnancy and contraception.
  • 11 January 2014 a monetary penalty of £185,000 to Department of Justice Northern Ireland after a filing cabinet containing details of a terrorist incident was sold at auction.

ICO statement on Monetary Penalties

Undertakings

Undertakings are formal agreements between an organisation and the ICO to undertake certain actions to avoid future breaches of the Data Protection Act, typically this involves, Encryption, Training and Management Procedures.

  • 19 December 2014 Treasury Solicitors Department. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that the Treasury Solicitors Department has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed February 2014.
  • 19 December 2014 Wirral Metropolitan Borough Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Wirral Metropolitan Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed April 2014.
  • 19 December 2014 Caerphilly County Borough Council. A council that ordered covert surveillance on a sick employee must review its approach after an Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) investigation. The ICO found the Council breached the Data Protection Act when it ordered the surveillance of an employee suspected of fraudulently claiming to be sick.
  • 15 December 2014 St Helens Metropolitan Borough Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that St Helens Metropolitan Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed June 2014.
  • 01 December 2014 Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed April 2014.
  • 28 November 2014 Oxfordshire County Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Oxfordshire County Council as appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed June 2014.
  • 28 November 2014 Aspers (Milton Keynes) Limited. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Aspers (Milton Keynes) Limited has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed June 2014.
  • 26 November 2014 Department of Justice Northern Ireland. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that the Department of Justice Northern Ireland has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed May 2014.
  • 17 November 2014 London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that London borough of Barking and Dagenham has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed April 2014.
  • 05 November 2014 Student Loans Company. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Student Loans Company has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed April 2014.
  • 05 November 2014 Royal Veterinary College. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that The Royal Veterinary College has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed October 2013.
  • 24 October 2014 Gwynedd Council. An Undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Gwynedd Council following two breaches of the Data Protection Act.
  • 24 October 2014 Disclosure and Barring Service. An undertaking to comply with the first data protection principle has been signed by the Disclosure and Barring Service.
  • 08 October 2014 South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust. An undertaking to comply with the first, third and seventh data protection principles has been signed by South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust. This includes the completion of a Privacy Impact Assessment in respect of data sharing. This follows an investigation whereby patient data related to 45, 431 data subjects was shared with a Clinical Commissioning Group (‘CCG’) without a legal basis to do so. There were also security concerns surrounding the manner in which the data was stored on discs when being distributed to the CCG.
  • 08 October 2014 Weathersby Limited. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Weathersby Limited after the company failed to secure an internal server properly, resulting in personal data relating to clients being made available on the internet.
  • 07 October 2014 Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. This follows an investigation into two reported incidents involving disclosures of personal data to third parties in error.
  • 25 September 2014 Norfolk Community Health & Care NHS Trust. An undertaking to comply with the first, third and seventh data protection principle has been signed by Norfolk Community Health & Care NHS Trust. This follows an investigation involving the inadvertent sharing of data with a referral management centre.
  • 22 September 2014 Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust.  This follows an investigation into two separate incidents involving disclosures of personal data.
  • 09 September 2014 Isle of Scilly Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Council of the Isle of Scilly. This follows an investigation into two separate incidents. The first relating to confidential information which was part of a disciplinary hearing being sent unredacted to third parties.
  • 28 August 2014 Racing Post. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Racing Post. This follows an investigation whereby the Racing Post website was subject to an internet based SQL injection attack which gave access to a customer database. The data included customer registration details relating to 677,335 data subjects.
  • 13 August 2014 Wokingham Borough Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Wokingham Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed April 2014.
  • 11 August 2014 Thamesview Estate Agents Ltd. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Thamesview Estate Agents Ltd after the company continued to leave papers containing personal information on the street despite a previous warning. The papers were stored in transparent bags and the information was clearly visible to anyone who walked past.
  • 18 July 2014 The Moray Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that The Moray Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed May 2014.
  • 09 July 2014 Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board after sensitive information was sent to the wrong address.
  • 27 June 2014 Oxfordshire County Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Oxfordshire County Council. This follows an investigation whereby a solicitor had removed a number of documents from the office but had dropped these in a street near their home. The sensitive personal data related to three child protection cases concerning 22 data subjects.
  • 23 June 2014 Aspers (Milton Keynes) Limited. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Aspers (Milton Keynes) Limited, following an email which was sent in error to an recipient outside of the organisation.
  • 19 June 2014 Department of Justice Northern Ireland. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Department of Justice Northern Ireland. This follows the sale of a filing cabinet that contained documents originating from within the Northern Ireland Prison service. The documents contained personal data, as defined by section 1 of the Data Protection Act 1998 (the Act), which was sensitive in nature.
  • 17 June 2014 Aberdeenshire Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Aberdeenshire Council after a paper file was lost by an employee of the Adult Mental Health section of the council’s Social Work service. The employee had placed the file on the roof of his car before driving off.
  • 16 June 2014 Cardiff and Vale University Health Board. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Cardiff and Vale University Health Board has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed October 2013.
  • 09 June 2014 Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust. This follows an investigation whereby the local press were handed a patient handover sheet containing details of 18 patients.
  • 02 June 2014 Jephson Homes Housing Association Ltd. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Jephson Homes Housing Association Ltd. This follows an investigation into the disclosure in error of several documents containing third party personal data when providing documents to an individual as part of a litigation process.
  • 30 May 2014 Panasonic UK. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Panasonic UK has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed October 2013.
  • 30 May 2014 St Helens Metropolitan Borough Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by St Helens Metropolitan Borough Council after child’s foster placement address was disclosed in error.  Investigations identified that Council had selected the correct recipient and had redacted the majority of documents disclosed however the address was missed on one document.
  • 30 May 2014 London Borough of Barking & Dagenham. An undertaking to respond in a quicker and more effective manner to losses of personal data has been signed by London Borough of Barking & Dagenham. This follows an investigation into the loss of a file containing medical data relating to eleven children, which discovered that although the council knew where the file was, it had still not been retrieved five months later.
  • 27 May 2014 Student Loans Company. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Student Loans Company Limited following an investigation by the ICO into three separate incidents involving the disclosure of documents to the incorrect recipients.  The investigation identified that whilst checking procedures were in place documents containing sensitive personal data were subject to fewer checks than those containing less sensitive data.
  • 16 May 2014 Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed November 2013.
  • 12 May 2014 The Moray Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by The Moray Council. This follows an investigation into the loss of a file containing adoption meeting papers at a café in the local area.
  • 25 April 2014 Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council. This follows an investigation whereby a social worker had left a case file containing sensitive personal data at a client’s home. The case file outlined child welfare concerns and disclosed the identity of the source.
  • 15 April 2014 Wirral Borough Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Wirral Borough Council after social services records containing sensitive personal information were sent to the wrong addresses on two occasions. The information, which was disclosed in February and April 2013, included sensitive personal details relating to two families living in the borough and in one case included details of a criminal offence committed by one of the family members.
  • 15 April 2014 Wokingham Borough Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Wokingham Borough Council, after sensitive social services records relating to the care of a young child were lost. The information, which had been requested by a family member, was lost after the delivery driver left the documents outside the requester’s home in August 2013.
  • 11 April 2014 Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed September 2013.
  • 28 March 2014 Barking, Havering & Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Barking, Havering & Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. This follows an investigation by the ICO into a series of fax related incidents which revealed that the Trust had a very low attendance rate for Information Governance training.
  • 20 March 2014 Disclosure and Barring Service. An undertaking to comply with the first data protection principle has been signed by the Disclosure and Barring Service.
  • 14 March 2014 Cardiff City Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Cardiff City Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed August 2013.
  • 13 March 2014 Neath Care. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Neath Care. This follows the disclosure of ten client care service delivery plans which were found by a member of the public in the street. The care service delivery plans related to elderly people and contained confidential client information on matters such as personal care, medication and key safe numbers.
  • 26 February 2014 Treasury Solicitor’s Department. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Treasury Solicitor’s Department. The data controller agreed to put measures in place to ensure the security of the personal data it handles.
  • 24 January 2014 Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed September 2013.
  • 10 January 2014 Northern Health and Social Care Trust. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Northern Health and

Prosecution

  • 13 November 2014 Harkanwarjit Dhanju. A former pharmacist working for West Sussex Primary Care Trust has been prosecuted for unlawfully accessing the medical records of family members, work colleagues and local health professionals. Harkanwarjit Dhanju was fined £1000, ordered to pay a £100 victim surcharge and £608.30 prosecution costs.
  • 11 November 2014 Matthew Devlin. Company director Matthew Devlin has been fined after illegally accessing one of Everything Everywhere’s (EE) customer databases. Devlin used details of when customers were due a mobile phone upgrade to target them with services offered by his own telecoms companies.
  • 22 August 2014 Dalvinder Singh. A Birmingham banker has been fined after he admitted reading his colleagues bank accounts. He worked in Santander UK’s suspicious activity reporting unit at their Leicester office. His role investigating allegations of money laundering meant he was able to view customer accounts. But he used his access to look at eleven colleagues’ accounts, to learn how much their salaries and bonuses were.
  • 06 August 2014 A Plus Recruitment Limited. A recruitment company has been prosecuted today at Doncaster Magistrates Court for failing to notify with the ICO. A Plus Recruitment Limited pleaded guilty and was fined £300 and ordered to pay costs of £489.95 and a victim surcharge of £30.
  • 05 August 2014 1st Choice Properties (SRAL). A property lettings and management company has been prosecuted for failing to notify with the ICO at Uxbridge Magistrates Court today. 1st Choice Properties (SRAL) was convicted in the defendant’s absence and fined £500, ordered to pay costs of £815.08 and a victim surcharge of £50.
  • 15 July 2014 Jayesh Shah. The owner of a marketing company trading as Vintels has been prosecuted for failing to notify the ICO of changes to his notification at Willesden Magistrates Court today. Jayesh Shah was fined £4000, ordered to pay costs of £2703 and a £400 victim surcharge.
  • 14 July 2014 Hayden Nash Consultants. A recruitment company has been prosecuted for failing to notify with the ICO at Reading Magistrates Court today. Hayden Nash Consultants entered a guilty plea and was fined £200, ordered to pay costs of £489.85 and a £20 victim surcharge.
  • 10 July 2014 Stephen Siddell. A former branch manager for Enterprise Rent-A-Car has been prosecuted for unlawfully stealing the records of almost two thousand customers before selling them to a claims management company. Stephen Siddell was fined £500, ordered to pay a £50 victim surcharge and £264.08 in prosecution costs.
  • 09 July 2014 Global Immigration Consultants Limited. A legal advice company has been prosecuted for failing to notify with the ICO at Manchester Magistrates Court today. Global Immigration Consultants Limited entered a guilty plea and was fined £300, ordered to pay costs of £260.18 and a £30 victim surcharge.
  • 06 June 2014 Darren Anthony Bott. The director of a pensions review company has been prosecuted for failing to notify with the ICO. Darren Anthony Bott of Allied Union Ltd entered a guilty plea and was fined £400, ordered to pay costs of £218.82 and a £40 victim surcharge.
  • 05 June 2014 API Telecom. A telecoms company has been prosecuted by the ICO for failing to comply with an information notice in Westminster Magistrates’ Court yesterday. The company, API Telecom, entered a guilty plea and was fined £200, ordered to pay full costs of £489.85 and the victim surcharge was imposed.
  • 13 May 2014 QR Lettings. A property company has been prosecuted by the ICO for failing to notify under section 17 of the Data Protection Act. QR Lettings pleaded guilty at a hearing on 13 May 2014 at Birkenhead Magistrates Court. The company was fined £250, ordered to pay costs of £260 and a £30 victim surcharge.
  • 25 April 2014 Barry Spencer. A man who ran a company that tricked organisations into revealing personal details about customers has been ordered to pay a total of £20,000 in fines and prosecution costs, as well as a confiscation order of over £69,000 at a hearing at Isleworth Crown Court.
  • 25 April 2014 Allied Union Limited. A pension review company has been prosecuted by the ICO for failing to notify under section 17 of the Data Protection Act.  Allied Union Limited pleaded guilty at a hearing on 25 April 2014 at Swansea Magistrates Court. The company was fined £400, ordered to pay costs of £338.11 and a victim surcharge of £40.
  • 25 March 2014 Help Direct UK Limited. A financial advisors has been prosecuted by the ICO for failing to notify under section 17 of the Data Protection Act. Help Direct UK Limited pleaded guilty at a hearing on 25 March 2014 at Swansea Magistrates Court. The company was fined £250, ordered to pay costs of £248.83 and a victim surcharge of £25.
  • 12 March 2014 Boilershield Limited. A plumbing company and its director have been prosecuted by the ICO for failing to notify under section 17 of the Data Protection Act. Boilershield Limited and its director, Mohammod Ali, pleaded guilty at a hearing on 12 March 2014 at Bromley Magistrates. They were both fined £1,200, ordered to pay costs of £196.87 and a victim surcharge of £120.
  • 11 March 2014 Becoming Green (UK) Ltd. A Cardiff-based green energy deal company, Becoming Green (UK) Ltd, has been prosecuted by the Information Commissioner’s Office after failing to notify the ICO that it handled customers’ personal data. The offence was uncovered when the company was being monitored following concerns about compliance.
  • 24 January 2014 ICU Investigations Limited. Six men who were part of a company that tricked organisations into revealing personal

Enforcements

  • 19 November 2014 Grampian Health Board (NHS Grampian). The Information Commissioner’s Office has ordered NHS Grampian to take action to make sure patients’ information is better protected.
  • 12 November 2014 Hot House Roof Company. The ICO has issued an enforcement notice against Hot House Roof Company ordering them to stop making nuisance marketing calls. The company had failed to honour suppression requests and repeatedly made calls to a number of individuals despite their being TPS registered.
  • 21 October 2014 Abdul Tayub. The Information Commissioner’s Office has served Abdul Tayub with an enforcement notice after he was found to be sending unsolicited marketing mail by electronic means without providing information as to his identity and without prior consent.
  • 12 September 2014 All Claims Marketing Limited. The Information Commissioner’s Office has served All Claims Marketing Limited with an enforcement notice after the company was found to be sending unsolicited marketing mail by electronic means without providing information as to its identity.
  • 03 September 2014 Winchester and Deakin Limited. The Information Commissioner’s Office has served Carmarthen-based direct marketing company Winchester and Deakin Limited (also trading as Rapid Legal and Scarlet Reclaim) with an enforcement notice ordering them to stop making nuisance calls. The move comes after an investigation discovered they had made unsolicited marketing calls to people who had registered with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS) or who had asked not to be contacted.
  • 16 June 2014 DC Marketing Limited. The ICO has issued an enforcement notice against DC Marketing Limited after the company made hundreds of nuisance calls to try and get people to purchase solar panels partly financed by the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund. An ICO investigation found the company also frequently gave a false name to avoid detection.
  • 29 May 2014 Wolverhampton City Council. The ICO has issued an enforcement notice against Wolverhampton City Council, following an investigation into a data breach at the council that occurred in January 2012. The breach was caused when a social worker, who had not received data protection training, sent out a report to a former service user detailing their time in care. However, the social worker failed to remove highly sensitive information about the recipient’s sister that should not have been included.
  • 03 April 2014 Amber UPVC Fabrications Ltd (T/A Amber Windows). The ICO has issued an enforcement notice against Amber Windows ordering them not to call subscribers who have previously told them not to ring or subscribers who have not consented to them calling and have registered the number with the TPS for at least the required 28 days.
  • 10 March 2014 Isisbyte Limited. The ICO has served an enforcement notice on Isisbyte Limited after the company was found to be making unsolicited marketing calls without providing information as to their identity.
  • 10 March 2014 SLM Connect Limited. The ICO has served an enforcement notice on SLM Connect Limited after the company was found to be making unsolicited marketing calls without providing information as to their identity.

Who has breached the Data Protection Act in 2012? Find the complete list here.

Who breached the Data Protection Act in 2013? Find the complete list here.

Travel company fined £150,000 after losing 1,163,996 Credit and Debit Card records

An online travel services company called Think W3 Limited, has been fined £150,000 after it breached the Data Protection Act.

Think W3 Limited was hacked in December 2012 after using insecure coding on the website of a subsidiary business, Essential Travel Ltd.

A hacker extracted a total of 1,163,996 Credit and Debit Card records. Of these records 430,599 were identified as current and 733,397 as expired.

Cardholder details had not been deleted since 2006 and there had been no security checks or reviews since the system had been installed.

Stephen Eckersley, The ICO’s Head of Enforcement, said:

This was a staggering lapse that left more than a million holiday makers’ personal details exposed to a malicious hacker.

“Data security should be a top priority for any business that operates online. Think W3 Limited accepted liability for failing to keep their customers’ personal data secure; failing to test their security and failing to delete out-of-date information.

“The public’s awareness of the importance of data protection is rising all the time. Ignorance from data controllers is no excuse. They must take active steps to ensure the personal data they are responsible for is kept safe or face enforcement action and the resulting reputational damage

The Information Commissioner’s fine will be in addition to the costs levied by the Credit Card schemes under PCI and the banks.

I thought I had published this months ago but found it still in my drafts.

2013 was a very busy year for the UK’s Information Commissioners Office (ICO) as he issued record numbers of fines and enforcements.

There are normally three types of punishments administered by the ICO:-

  1. Monetary. The most serious of the actions and one normally reserved for organisational entities.
  2. Undertaking. Typically applied when an organisation has failed to adhere to good business practise and needs the helping guidance of the ICO
  3. Prosecutions. Normally reserved for individuals who have blatantly breached the Act and like 2012 there were not many in 2013.

The complete list of those who fell foul of the Data Protection Act in 2013 is below:-

Monetary penalty notices

A monetary penalty will only be served in the most serious situations. When deciding the size of a monetary penalty, the ICO takes into account the seriousness of the breach and other factors like the size, financial and other resources of an organisation’s data controller. The ICO can impose a penalty of up to £500,000. It is worth noting that monetary penalties are to HM Treasury. The size of the fines might change with the pending revision to the Data Protection Act.

The list has the most recent first.

  • 16 December 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on First Financial (UK) Limited after the pay day Loans Company sent millions of spam text messages.
  • 29 October 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on North East Lincolnshire Council after the loss of an unencrypted memory device containing personal data and sensitive personal data relating to 286 children.
  • 22 October 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on the Ministry of Justice for failing to keep personal data securely, after spreadsheets showing prisoners’ details were emailed to members of the public in error.
  • 26 September 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on Jala Transport, a small money-lending business, after the theft of an unencrypted portable hard drive containing its customer database.
  • 29 August 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on Aberdeen City Council after inadequate home working arrangements led to 39 pages of personal data being uploaded onto the internet by a Council employee.
  • 23 August 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Islington Borough Council after personal details of over 2,000 residents were released online via the What Do They Know (WDTK) website.
  • 5 August 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to the Bank of Scotland after customers’ account details were repeatedly faxed to the wrong recipients. The information included payslips, bank statements, account details and mortgage applications, along with customers’ names, addresses and contact details.
  • 12 July 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served on NHS Surrey following the discovery of sensitive personal data belonging to thousands of patients on hard drives sold on an online auction site. Whilst NHS Surrey has now been dissolved outstanding issues are now being dealt with by the Department of Health.
  • 8 July 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Tameside Energy Services Ltd after the Manchester based company blighted the public with unwanted marketing calls.
  • 18 June 2013. Monetary penalty notices have been served to Nationwide Energy Services and We Claim You Gain – both companies are part of Save Britain Money Ltd based in Swansea. The penalties were issued after the companies were found to be responsible for over 2,700 complaints to the Telephone Preference Service or reports to the ICO using its online survey, between 26 May 2011 and end of December 2012.
  • 13 June 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust, after several faxes containing sensitive personal data were sent to a member of the public in error.
  • 7 June 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Glasgow City Council, following the loss of two unencrypted laptops, one of which contained the personal information of 20,143 people.
  • 5 June 2013. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Halton Borough Council, in respect of an incident in which the home address of adoptive parents was wrongly disclosed to the birth family.
  • 3 June 2013. A monetary penalty has been served to Stockport Primary Care Trust following the discovery of a large number of patient records at a site formerly owned by the Trust.
  • 20 March 2013. A monetary penalty has been served to DM Design Bedroom Ltd. The company has been the subject of nearly 2,000 complaints to the ICO and the Telephone Preference Service. The company consistently failed to check whether individuals had opted out of receiving marketing calls and responded to just a handful of the complaints received.
  • 15 February 2013. A monetary penalty has been served to the Nursing and Midwifery Council. The council lost three DVDs related to a nurse’s misconduct hearing, which contained confidential personal information and evidence from two vulnerable children. An ICO investigation found the information was not encrypted.
  • 24 January 2013. A monetary penalty has been served to the entertainment company Sony Computer Entertainment Europe Limited following a serious breach of the Data Protection Act. The penalty comes after the Sony PlayStation Network Platform was hacked in April 2011, compromising the personal information of millions of customers, including their names, addresses, email addresses, dates of birth and account passwords. Customers’ payment card details were also at risk. Appeal withdrawn.

Undertakings

Undertakings are formal agreements between an organisation and the ICO to undertake certain actions to avoid future breaches of the Data Protection Act, typically this involves, Encryption, Training and Management Procedures.

The list has the most recent first.

  • 20 December 2013. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Luton Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed September 2013.
  • 26 November 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead, following an incident in which restricted information about employees was disclosed on its intranet in error.
  • 22 November 2013. An undertaking to comply with the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations has been signed by Better Together. The organisation must neither transmit, nor instigate the transmission of, unsolicited communications for the purposes of direct marketing by means of electronic mail to individual subscribers unless the recipient of the electronic mail has previously notified Better Together that they consent.  A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Foyle Women’s Aid has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed August 2013.
  • 21 November 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust. This follows four incidents involving the accidental disclosure of sensitive personal data.
  • 1 November 2013. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that The Health and Care Professions Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed July 2013.
  • 1 November 2013. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Mansfield District Borough Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed January 2013.
  • 25 October 2013. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that The Burnett Practice has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed in April 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Panasonic UK. This follows the theft of an unencrypted laptop containing personal data relating to people who had attended a hospitality event run by a third party company on Panasonic’s behalf.
  • 15 October 2013. An Undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Royal Veterinary College. This follows the loss of a memory card containing personal data. In addition, data protection training is not considered to be adequate and the RVC does not appear to be taking steps to address this proactively. This highlights a potentially serious failing in respect of staff awareness of Information Governance policies. Their investigation revealed that the device was personally owned by the employee and as such fell outside of the policies and procedures in place. However, the RVC does not appear to have accounted for the possibility of employees using their own devices in the workplace.
  • 7 October 2013. An Undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.
  • 4 October 2013. An Undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Cardiff & Vale University Health Board, following the loss of documents containing sensitive personal data by a consultant.
  • 29 August 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Aberdeen City Council after inadequate home working arrangements led to 39 pages of personal data being uploaded onto the internet by a Council employee.
  • 11 September 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Luton Borough Council following several incidents involving inappropriate handling of sensitive personal data. Investigation of these incidents revealed that previous recommendations made by the ICO had not been implemented.
  • 28 August 2013. An undertaking to comply with the sixth data protection principle has been signed by Cardiff City Council. The Council agreed to put measures in place to ensure greater compliance with subject access requests.
  • 22 August 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Local Government Ombudsman. This follows the theft of a bag containing hard copy papers relating to complaints made to the Local Government Ombudsman (the LGO) including some SPD. It is felt that the provision of data protection training was insufficient to ensure staff awareness of policies and procedures relating to the use of personal data.
  • 13 August 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Northern Health & Social Care Trust. This follows a number of security incidents which led to a formal investigation into the Trust’s compliance with the Act. One incident in May 2011, involved confidential service user information being faxed from a ward in Antrim Hospital to a local business in error. The investigation into the Trust revealed that despite the Trust having introduced what should have been mandatory Information Governance training for all staff, the majority of staff involved in these incidents had not received this training. This highlighted a potentially serious failing in respect of staff awareness of Information Governance policies. In particular, the failure to monitor and enforce staff completion of training was a concern.
  • 13 August 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Foyle Women’s Aid. This follows the temporary loss of a folder belonging to a Criminal Justice Support worker employed by Foyle Women’s Aid that was left in a café. The folder contained confidential client information. An apparent lack of effective controls and procedures for taking information out of the office was a contributor to the loss of highly sensitive personal data.
  • 16 July 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Janet Thomas. This follows a report made by a member of the public that approximately 7,435 CV files, containing personal data, were being stored unprotected on the website http://www.janetpage.com.
  • 9 July 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) after an incident in which papers containing personal data were stolen on a train in 2011.
  • 12 June 2013. (issued 10 September 2012) An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Bedford Borough Council relating to the removal of legacy data from a social care database.
  • 12 June 2013 (issued 18 September 2012). An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Central Bedfordshire Council relating to the removal of legacy data from a social care database and in relation to the preparation of planning application documentation for publication.
  • 31 May 2013. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Leeds City Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed November 2012.
  • Prospect. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Prospect has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed January 2013.
  • 21 May 2013 (issued 9 November 2011). An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by News Group Newspapers, following an attack on the website of The Sun newspaper in 2011.
  • 26 April 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by The Burnett Practice. This follows an investigation whereby an email account used by the practice had been subject to a third party attack. The email account subject to the attack was used to provide test results to patients and included a list of names and email addresses.
  • 4 April 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the East Riding of Yorkshire Council, following incidents last year in which personal data was inappropriately disclosed.
  • 25 January 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Managing Director of Mansfield District Council. This follows a number of incidents where personal data of housing benefit claimants was disclosed to the wrong landlord.
  • 16 January 2013. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the union Prospect. This follows an incident in which two files containing personal details of approximately 19,000 members of the union had been sent to an unknown third party email address in error.

Prosecutions

The list has the most recent first.

  • 3 December 2013. A former manager who oversaw the finances of a GP’s practice in Maidstone has been prosecuted by the ICO after unlawfully accessing the medical records of approximately 1,940 patients registered with the surgery. Steven Tennison was prosecuted under section 55 of the Data Protection Act at Maidstone Magistrates Court.
  • 8 October 2013. A pay day loans company based in London and its director have been prosecuted after failing to register that the business was processing personal information. Hamed Shabani, the sole director of First Financial, was convicted under section 61 of the Data Protection Act at City of London Magistrates Court.
  • 25 September 2013. A former Barclays Bank employee has been fined after illegally accessing the details of a customer’s account. In one case the employee, Jennifer Addo, found out the number of children the customer had and passed the details to the customer’s then partner, who was a friend of Ms Addo.
  • 15 August 2013. A probation officer who revealed a domestic abuse victim’s new address to the alleged perpetrator has been fined £150 following a prosecution bought by the ICO.

Find the 2012 list here.

Health sector needs to improve its data protection

The Information Commissioner’s Office report on how organisations providing secondary health care are complying with the Data Protection Act and highlights areas that need improvement.

The report summarises the results of 19 audits, mostly against NHS Trusts.

The audits looked at how personal data is handled by the organisation, and fit alongside NHS information governance guidelines. The organisations voluntarily agreed to work with the ICO to identify good practice and, where necessary, improve procedures relating to the handling of personal data.

The Audits found:

  • All the organisations had data protection policies and procedures in place, though compliance with the policies wasn’t always effectively monitored, for instance through spot checks.
  • All the organisations had a system in place to track health records, though some did not conduct audits for missing files. The physical security of records also varied, with concern raised particularly around unlocked trollies used for moving files.
  • There was also a lack of simple password controls, notably forcing regular password changes.
  • Some organisations had little in the way of fire or flood protection in place for paper records.
  • All organisations had appropriate information governance related risk registers and risk assessments that were regularly reviewed.
  • Concern was raised around the use of fax machines for sending personal information, given the human error associated with using a fax machine.

Before three of the audits, staff were surveyed about their awareness of data protection policies

  • 88% of staff had read and understood the policy in place within their organisation
  • 94% had completed data protection training within the previous year

Claire Chadwick, ICO Team Manager in the Good Practice team, said:

Information about a person’s health tends to be one of the most sensitive types of personal data, and it is clear it must be properly handled.

“Our experiences in these audits suggested that tended to be the case. Only one of the audits suggested a substantial risk of non-compliance with the law, while more than half gave reasonable assurance the law was being complied with.

“By paying attention to this report, more organisations in this sector can ensure they are handling personal information properly. This report is an opportunity to review and improve practices and procedures based on our experiences

The audits followed a letter from the Information Commissioner and the Chief Executive of the NHS Sir David Nicholson to chief executives and finance directors within the NHS.

The full report can be found here.

Who breached the Data Protection Act in the first half of 2013?

As we have passed the first half of 2013, I thought it would be a good time to publish the entire list of who fell foul of the UK Data Protection Act and were punished by the Information Commissioner (ICO).

There are three types of punishments administered by the ICO

  1. Monetary. The most serious of the actions and one normally reserved for organisational entities.
  2. Undertaking. Typically applied when an organisation has failed to adhere to good business practice and needs the helping guidance of the ICO
  3. Prosecutions. Normally reserved for individuals who have blatantly breached the Act.

Monetary penalty notices

A monetary penalty will only be served in the most serious situations. When deciding the size of a monetary penalty, the ICO takes into account the seriousness of the breach and other factors like the size, financial and other resources of an organisation’s data controller. The ICO can impose a penalty of up to £500,000. It is worth noting that monetary penalties are paid to HM Treasury and not to the ICO. Many argue that the ICO would be a stronger body if it had more money and penalties is a good way to generate more revenue – a self funding government department.

  • 12 July 2013 NHS Surrey. A monetary penalty notice has been served on NHS Surrey following the discovery of sensitive personal data belonging to thousands of patients on hard drives sold on an online auction site. Whilst NHS Surrey has now been dissolved outstanding issues are now being dealt with by the Department of Health.
  • 8 July 2013 Tameside Energy Services Ltd. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Tameside Energy Services Ltd after the Manchester based company blighted the public with unwanted marketing calls.
  • 18 June 2013 Nationwide Energy Services and We Claim You Gain. Monetary penalty notices have been served to Nationwide Energy Services and We Claim You Gain – both companies are part of Save Britain Money Ltd based in Swansea. The penalties were issued after the companies were found to be responsible for over 2,700 complaints to the Telephone Preference Service or reports to the ICO using its online survey, between 26 May 2011 and end of December 2012.
  • 13 June 2013 North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust. A monetary penalty notice has been served to North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust, after several faxes containing sensitive personal data were sent to a member of the public in error.
  • 7 June 2013 Glasgow City Council. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Glasgow City Council, following the loss of two unencrypted laptops, one of which contained the personal information of 20,143 people.
  • 5 June 2013 Halton Borough Council. A monetary penalty notice has been served to Halton Borough Council, in respect of an incident in which the home address of adoptive parents was wrongly disclosed to the birth family.
  • 3 June 2013 Stockport Primary Care Trust. A monetary penalty has been served to Stockport Primary Care Trust following the discovery of a large number of patient records at a site formerly owned by the Trust.
  • 20 March 2013 DM Design Bedroom Ltd. A monetary penalty has been served to DM Design Bedroom Ltd. The company has been the subject of nearly 2,000 complaints to the ICO and the Telephone Preference Service. The company consistently failed to check whether individuals had opted out of receiving marketing calls and responded to just a handful of the complaints received.
  • 15 February 2013 Nursing and Midwifery Council. A monetary penalty has been served to the Nursing and Midwifery Council. The council lost three DVDs related to a nurse’s misconduct hearing, which contained confidential personal information and evidence from two vulnerable children. An ICO investigation found the information was not encrypted.
  • 24 January 2013 Sony Computer Entertainment Europe Limited. A monetary penalty has been served to the entertainment company Sony Computer Entertainment Europe Limited following a serious breach of the Data Protection Act. The penalty comes after the Sony PlayStation Network Platform was hacked in April 2011, compromising the personal information of millions of customers, including their names, addresses, email addresses, dates of birth and account passwords. Customers’ payment card details were also at risk. They failed in their bid to appeal.

Undertakings

Undertakings are formal agreements between an organisation and the ICO to undertake certain actions to avoid future breaches of the Data Protection Act, typically this involves, Encryption, Training and Management Procedures.

  • 16 July 2013 Janet Thomas. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Janet Thomas. This follows a report made by a member of the public that approximately 7,435 CV files, containing personal data, were being stored unprotected on the website
  • 9 July 2013 Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) after an incident in which papers containing personal data were stolen on a train in 2011.
  • 12 June 2013 (issued 10 September 2012) Bedford Borough Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Bedford Borough Council relating to the removal of legacy data from a social care database.
  • 2 June 2013 (issued 18 September 2012) Central Bedfordshire Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by Central Bedfordshire Council relating to the removal of legacy data from a social care database and in relation to the preparation of planning application documentation for publication.
  • 31 May 2013 Leeds City Council. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Leeds City Council has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed November 2012.
  • May Prospect. A follow up has been completed to provide an assurance that Prospect has appropriately addressed the actions agreed in its undertaking signed January 2013.
  • 21 May 2013 (issued 9 November 2011) News Group Newspapers. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by News Group Newspapers, following an attack on the website of The Sun newspaper in 2011.
  • 26 April 2013 The Burnett Practice. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by The Burnett Practice. This follows an investigation whereby an email account used by the practice had been subject to a third party attack. The email account subject to the attack was used to provide test results to patients and included a list of names and email addresses.
  • 4 April 2013 East Riding of Yorkshire Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the East Riding of Yorkshire Council, following incidents last year in which personal data was inappropriately disclosed.
  • 25 January 2013 Mansfield District Council. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the Managing Director of Mansfield District Council. This follows a number of incidents where personal data of housing benefit claimants was disclosed to the wrong landlord.
  • 16 January 2013 Prospect. An undertaking to comply with the seventh data protection principle has been signed by the union Prospect. This follows an incident in which two files containing personal details of approximately 19,000 members of the union had been sent to an unknown third party email address in error.

Prosecutions

  • 23 May 2013 A former manager of a health service based at a council-run leisure centre in Southampton has been prosecuted under section 55 of the Data Protection Act for unlawfully obtaining sensitive medical information relating to over 2,000 people.
  • 8 April 2013 A Hertfordshire estate agent has been prosecuted under section 17 of the Data Protection Act after failing to notify with the ICO.
  • 12 March 2013 A former receptionist at a GP surgery in Southampton has been prosecuted under section 55 of the Data Protection Act for unlawfully obtaining sensitive medical information relating to her ex-husband’s new wife.

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